Tag: domain

Domain Mistakes

#2 Mistake – My Unused Domain Has No Value

Remember when you bought a set of domains to protect your brand as it grows? You were so proud of yourself – planned for your most important digital asset. Years have passed, and you haven’t used them, so you think they have no value.

Think again! Your unused domains have value.

Sometimes, our need for a domain or set of domains is no longer relevant; some customers leave them to expire, and others try to resell them via third parties. But here’s the thing: If you think that your domain or domains have no value 90% of the time, it is because there was no consideration given to the value of those domains when you acquired them.

You know what happens? It becomes a bargain for the buyer, but you just give money away. In some cases, we’ve even seen domain holders try to buy back their old domains later because they altered their business model or expanded faster than expected. We see this mistake frequently repeated despite our hand-waving.

Our best advice is to think twice about letting a good domain expire. It may be better to hang on to it, so think long-term rather than short-term. And if the financials are an issue, have a chat with us about possible domain parking solutions.

If you want to let them go after or see their value or lack of value, Okens Domains can help you assess their value. And here’s the really good part for you — it doesn’t matter which domain registration company those domains are with; we will help you sell them and reduce your time worrying about whether you did the right thing.

Stay tuned for the next story in March for our Mistake of the Month series. In the meantime visit www.okens.domains to learn how we can help.

Domain Mistakes

Mistake #1: Creating A New Brand Without The Domain

Recently, a customer came to us to acquire the most strategic domain for their new brand only to find that it had already been taken by another company with the country Top Level Domain (TLD) of their primary country of business. They had put considerable thought, resources and money into the brand design and positioning.

Ouch.

We see this happening a lot more than it should, but don’t worry; we have three tips to prevent this kind of mistake. And remember, we are here for you so get in touch – a real human will answer the phone. 

  1. Think domains from the beginning – even when you start your brand brainstorms. Think about the countries you need to operate in and the countries you want to expand into. There might be specific TLDs that make more sense and then you can see if they are available. It’s better to invest time at the start of the new brand than to waste money and resources developing a brand and a name.

  2. Look at associated domains via a simple domain gap analysis to safeguard your brand going forward. (we can do that for you!)

  3. In the case of the customer, they chose to use Okens Brokerage capabilities to negotiate and purchase the domain. We acquired the domain for them at a reasonable rate, safeguarding the marketing investment they made.

Stay tuned for the next story in February for our Mistake of the Month  – Don’t Waste Unused Domains. But in the meantime, read more about how to protect your domain on our OI Blog. 

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Photo by Jan Kopřiva on Unsplash

Domains

The Real, Real – How Domains Work

Hey there! As part of our “How to” series, we want to take a closer look at something we all use daily but might take for granted: how domains actually work.

A domain name is like the address of your website that people type into their browser’s address bar. It’s much easier to remember for us humans than a numerical IP address. When you type in a domain name, it sends a request to a global network of servers called the Domain Name System (DNS). These servers work their magic and direct you to the right place where the domain is hosted.

Domains are divided into two main categories: generic top-level domains (gTLD) and new top-level domains (new gTLD). These categories help keep domains organized and make managing and finding them easier.

Generic top-level domains

The generic top-level domains (gTLDs) or new gTLDs are generic domain extensions listed at the highest level in the domain name system. Hundreds of gTLDs are available, but the most popular ones are .com, .org, .net, .biz, and .info. Others pertain to specific sectors such as .bet or .casino.

One of the primary differences between gTLDs and other TLDs (such as ccTLDs) is that they are the easiest to register and maintain. Anyone, anywhere, can register and manage a gTLD. This makes them a popular choice for businesses and individuals alike who want to establish a strong online presence quickly and easily.

Country Code Top Level Domain

Country code top-level domains, or ccTLDs, are domain names specific to a country. They end with country code extensions such as .uk for the United Kingdom, .de for Germany, and .au for Australia. Websites use them to target audiences in a particular country. 

Most ccTLDs worldwide are governed by their respective local governments and have specific requirements for registration. For instance, TLDs like.NO, .CA, .AU requires a local presence. To register any of these TLDs, you must be Norwegian, Canadian, or Australian. 

In some cases, such as.IT, .EU, .FR, ccTLDs have EU-presence requirements. 

In extreme cases, such as.COM.BR, the registry may require a notarially certified document for registration or subsequent actions such as transfer to another registrar company.

Sponsored Top Level Domain – sTLD

Sponsored top-level domains (sTLDs) are a valuable category of TLDs, with a sponsor representing a specific community served by the domain extension. They are ideal for industries or communities that need a dedicated online presence and aim to differentiate themselves from the rest of the web. 

One of the key benefits of an sTLD is that it is regulated by the sponsor, which enables them to maintain control over the domain extension and ensure that it serves the community’s needs. For instance, .apple is governed and managed by the Apple corporation, which ensures that the domain extension aligns with the company’s values and goals. Similarly, .ORG is sponsored by the Public Interest Registry (PIR), a non-profit organization that operates in the public interest.

Domain registries manage all top-level domains (except sponsored TLDs). There are numerous registries for global domains like .com managed by organizations such as ICANN and country-specific or community/vertical-specific registries. 

These registries then enter agreements with registrars like Okens to sell domain names to users worldwide. A registrar like Okens will typically manage the domain on your behalf, dealing with records, renewals, transfers, etc., while providing guidance and expertise on confidentiality and privacy.

At Okens, we take pride in our global reach, working with registries worldwide and many community-led TLD registries. This allows us to assist you globally and provide the most vertical/community-specific TLDs. 

Our focus on B2B means that we aim to provide you with the best possible service by offering advice and help from a human representative, ensuring that your needs are met with the best care and attention.

Don’t Let Your Domains Turn Into The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

👹 👻 It’s Halloween, and no one should have to face a Texas Chain Saw Massacre in their brand’s domain. Cyber or typosquatting is a real threat that every company must be prepared to face. Don’t be fooled into thinking you’re safe from it. Horror stories can happen to anyone, even from something that happens closer to the beast – your own backyard.

Domain mistakes can damage your reputation and revenues. There might be 13 Halloween 🎃movies in the franchise, but here are six screams to watch out for when you register your domain. Give Okens.domains a call to avoid all these and survive another night.

1. Always proofread the domain name before you register or publicize it
2. Always research who else owns matching TLDs
3. Don’t publish your URL before you have registered a domain name
4. Don’t let your critical domain names expire
5. Be careful who you share your plans with
6. Always understand TLD restrictions

Photo by Sabina Music Rich on Unsplash

domain

Best Practices To Manage Domains

As a part of our OI blog best practice series, we bring you the first in a series of articles about ways you can manage your domain strategically and efficiently. Establishing a few best practices is a great way to ensure your domains aren’t hijacked, expired, or cyber squatted.

Here are three domain management practices that can help minimise domain risk and ensure domain dominance.

More…
create a custom domain like a rockstar

So, You Want To Make A Custom Domain Like Will.i.am?

Will.i.am, the multi-talented Black-Eyed Peas artist, has not only created a brand with his name but also a domain that represents his identity and what he stands for. His success inspires us to learn from his experience and follow in his footsteps. Here are four amazing tips to do it like a pro and create a successful brand.
More…

Domain Renewal

Renew It Or Lose It

You know the story. You want a domain. You buy a domain. Just pull out your credit card, and €60 later, you have a global domain. Done. You’re up and running. Your site looks great. Visitors are click, click, clicking. Everyone is happy and time marches on. Then, one morning things turn for the worse. Your domain is being used by another company. All your traffic is going to a new site, and your customers are finding themselves on a site that has no relationship to your brand and is so far from your product offering you’re bordering on massive revenue loss. What happened? Your domain expired and someone else took it. 

If you don’t think it can happen to you, let’s look at the Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Association (MVA). The MVA used the site www.starspangled200.org to commemorate the War of 1812 on its state license plates between 2012 and 2016. The site www.starspangled200.org was designed and owned by the War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission in 2007 to raise funds for bicentennial projects and events. But somewhere between 2016, the domain stopped being about the history of the War of 1812 and started being about online casinos in the Philippines. 

A March 2023 Vice article reported that close to 800,000 drivers in Maryland have the starspangled200.org on their license plates. But what they did not know was that over that period of time, that starspangled website stopped being about the War of 1812 and became a website for an online casino in the Philippines at https://www.globeinternational.info/

The article notes that the domain registration information on starspangled200.org had been re-registered and transferred a number of times in the past several years. Today, starspangled.org goes directly to the MVA website and Maryland drivers can safely resume driving without advertising a casino.

How does it affect you? The MVA situation seems an issue that no one would overlook, but it happens. A domain expires, no one renews it and another company takes it over. 

This shows the importance of renewals and the attention that needs to be taken by both the domain user and the registrar company. So, here are four easy steps to prevent your domain from being lost to someone else. 

  • Turn on auto-renew on all your domains
  • Get a gap analysis with Okens on all your domains to find your domain risks
  • Ensure you have worldwide coverage for your domain so no domains are exposed to hackers or thiefs
  • Create a domain line of credit to ensure all your domains renew and are paid for at the same time 

For more information on auto-renew and a domain line of credit, visit Okens 

 

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